Review: Desperate Paths by E.C. Diskin

Synopsis: In Eden, the truth can have deadly consequences.

Brooklyn Anderson knows it looks bad. She was found wiping down a gun. Her father now dead. His blood on her hands. The incomprehensible nightmare has started.

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Seven days earlier, Brooklyn had returned to Eden to care for her beloved father, who lay helpless in a hospital bed. Her estranged sister, Ginny, said he fell. But as Brooklyn soon realizes, Ginny is prone to lying.

Former Eden resident Darius Woods was in the hospital too. The famous actor had written a screenplay that would lay bare all the secrets of the town, but within hours of his return, someone shot him.

As the Woods investigation proceeds, and Brooklyn starts to question everything she believes about her family, her neighbors, and her home, secrets and lies begin to unravel. But nothing can prepare her for where those lies will finally lead.

And sharing the truth of what happened the night her father died might just make things worse. 


Review// E.C. Diskin reached out to me to review her newest book, Desperate Paths, because I thoroughly enjoyed one of her previous novels Broken Grace (click here for the review). Upon reading even just the first few pages of this new one, I knew I was in for a fun ride once again.

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Book Review: Night Driving: A Story of Faith in the Dark by Addie Zierman

Synopsis: How do you know God is real?
 
In the emotionally-charged, fire-filled faith in which Addie Zierman grew up, the answer to this question was simple: Because you’ve FELT him.

Now, at age 30, she feels nothing. Just the darkness pressing in. Just the winter cold. Just a buzzing silence where God’s voice used to be.

So she loads her two small children into the minivan one February afternoon and heads south in one last-ditch effort to find the Light.

In her second memoir, Night Driving, Addie Zierman powerfully explores the gap between our sunny, faith fictions and a God who often seems hidden and silent.

Against the backdrop of rushing Interstates, strangers’ hospitality, gas station coffee, and screaming children, Addie stumbles toward a faith that makes room for doubt, disappointment, and darkness…and learns that sometimes you have to run away to find your way home.


Review // It took me longer than I’d like to admit to finish this book. I’ll admit that this is one of the first nonfiction/memoir-type novels that I’ve read in quite awhile. My typical choice of book is a thriller of sorts.

Night Driving is not a thriller, but rather it’s a book that pulls you from page to page with its raw emotion. Continue reading